Monday, July 16, 2018

Crest Gum & Enamel Repair: Healthier Teeth Start at the Gum Line


Gum problems are the root of some key oral health issues. Crest Gum & Enamel Repair toothpaste targets the gum line to neutralize plaque bacteria and penetrates the tooth's surface to repair weakened enamel.

Friday, July 13, 2018

Why Preventative Dentistry Is Better Than Restorative Dentistry


Going to the dentist may be the last thing you'd want to do. The dentist office is the last place you'd ever want to be. Maybe you've had a traumatic past experience at the dentist office. Maybe you're scared of pain or something going wrong at your appointment. Maybe you're too ashamed to step into the dentist office fearing what the dentist will find after not having seen a dentist in many years. Maybe you're just starting out on your own and don't want to deal with the hassle of shopping around for dental insurance, so you avoid the dentist.

You may think that your mouth is healthy. After all you have a stellar at-home oral hygiene routine and you avoid those taboo foods and drinks such as candy, bread, soda and coffee. You eat a healthy diet and drink plenty of water. You may think that the dental office visit is optional or unnecessary. You only see the dentist only in those times something isn't right.

There are many fears and reasoning that keep people from regularly going to the dentist and getting the preventative dental care they need. Many patients treat the dentist like they do their doctor. They forego the routine, preventative appointments and instead only go when they notice something abnormal or are experiencing pain or discomfort.

This way of going about one's overall and oral health is not the best. In fact, it can be putting your overall and oral health at risk.

Specifically, here are some reasons why preventative dentistry is better than restorative dentistry:

Save Money

The most noticeable advantage preventative dentistry has over restorative dentistry is the money one will save on dental procedures. A routine, six-month professional teeth cleaning and dental examination will cost less than a filling or a crown. In fact, many dental insurance plans cover two semi-annual dental check-ups and cleaning, but they won't give you "free" crowns or fillings.

Save Time

When you go in for a dental check-up, you're in and out within minutes and you won't leave the dentist office with pain or discomfort. There is no complicated procedure, no ordering or dental appliances and no recovery time needed. On the flip side, while most restorative dental procedures have become routine and easy and quick to perform, they may entail a follow-up appointment, entail a longer dental appointment and involve a waiting period for a needed dental device.

If you're busy, chances are you want to get back on your regular routine and schedule as soon as possible.

Become Comfortable With Your Fear

Patients who make it a point to come and see their dentist for a preventative check-up to stem the possible occurrence of future dental health issues, will more likely have more pleasant, quick and hassle-free appointments. Associating the dental office with these pleasant experiences will initiate a change of attitude towards the dental office and may even start breaking down those negative past dental office experiences. In addition, the more frequently you come into the dentist office, the quicker you'll get use to the unpleasant smells and noises.

The dentist may not ever become your favorite place to visit, but if you make it a goal to regularly visit for a check-up and cleaning, you'll better insure a healthy mouth which in turn lowers your risk of expensive, more intensive and time-consuming restorative dental work.

If you haven't been to the dentist in many years for any reason, and have not kept up with preventative dentistry, it is still important to schedule an appointment with your dentist. Sometimes restorative dental work is necessary to ensure the best dental health for the patient.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Anna_Bird/2355855

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Tuesday, July 10, 2018

What Are Dental Sealants and Why Should My Child Get Them?


You may have taken your young child to the dentist office where the dentist suggests your son or daughter get sealants. Sealants are great ways to protect your child's teeth, in addition to daily, proper oral hygiene.

Dental sealants are usually recommended for young children who are in the early stages of learning to properly brush their teeth. They can, however, be placed on adult's teeth. Seniors who have arthritis and other issues that keep them from properly brushing and flossing their teeth can also benefit from sealants.

Brushing their teeth can be challenging for small children. Comfortably gripping the toothbrush, learning the right toothbrush motions and resisting the urge to swallow the toothpaste can make teeth brushing very difficult. As a result, children can get frustrated and not brush as well as they should.

Sealants won't make teeth brushing fun, though it is important for your child to enjoy brushing his or her teeth, but they can provide a safety buffer to make up for their inadequate, less-than-ideal teeth cleaning.

When children are first learning to brush their teeth, there are many areas where they may miss, such as brushing the back molars or the backside of their front teeth. When those hard to reach places aren't cleaned, the trapped food particles can breakdown and form cavity-causing plaque.

Sealants help protect a child's teeth by covering the teeth with a thin, plastic covering. Sealants can't be felt and their transparent nature makes them unnoticeable. Usually, sealants are placed over the molars as those teeth get a lot of chewing action and they are hard to reach when brushing and flossing.

Sealants are most effective when they are placed over the molars shortly after they erupt, or come up from the gumline, which is typically at ages 6 and 12. The process of placing sealants is quick, easy and pain-free.

Sealants are often made from clear plastic that fits snuggly around individual teeth, making them virtually unnoticeable to the child and others.

Why Sealants?

As mentioned previously, dental sealants block out cavity-causing debris, germs and bacteria. While your child should learn daily, proper oral hygiene, sealants help protect their teeth from decay by complimenting their established teeth cleaning routine.

Cavities are one of the most widespread and preventable childhood diseases. The over-indulgence of unhealthy, sugary snacks as well as inadequate oral hygiene are the two major causes.

Sealants prevent food particles, especially sugar, from getting embedded onto the surface and crevices of teeth. With the teeth (mainly molars) being protected from cavity-causing plaque and food debris build-up, your child will have a significantly lower chance of tooth decay.

Tooth decay in children is often overlooked. It isn't uncommon for the health of a child's primary (or baby) teeth to be neglected. Many parents think that the baby teeth are unimportant because they will all eventually fall out. However, cavities in the baby teeth can filter down into the up-and-coming permanent adult teeth. Children who start off with cavities risk other oral health issues such as crooked or misshapen teeth and misaligned bites. The psychological block a child may develop from early cavities may make him or her apathetic towards proper, daily oral hygiene and he or she may even dislike and resist properly caring for their teeth and gums later in life.

Sealants not only help protect childrens' teeth from cavities, but it also gives them added self-confidence and have a greater joy of properly caring for their oral health.

If your child may need sealants, schedule an appointment with your child's pediatric dentist.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9965171

Saturday, July 7, 2018

What You Can Do About Bleeding Gums


Bleeding gums are often a cause for concern as well as they should be in most cases. Bleeding gums are often caused by something not right with your gums. Your gums have become weak and injured. Some of these causes are cause for great alarm, such as the beginning of periodontal disease. Others, are easily preventable and reversed, such as brushing or flossing too vigorously. Sometimes bleeding gums are caused by hormones that can be outside of your immediate control.

Treatment Options for Bleeding Gums

Whatever the cause may be, the first step in getting them treated is to see your dentist. He or she will be able to assess whether your bleeding gums are the result of gum disease or by something else.

Periodontal Disease Treatment

If your dentist determines you have periodontal disease, there are many courses of action they may recommend depending on the severity. If you have the early stages, it can be easily reversed with good dental hygiene and regular visits to the dental office.

In more severe cases, where the periodontal disease has advanced, your dentist may recommend scaling or root planing to limit the build-up of plaque and slow down the progression of the disease. Ongoing periodontal therapy may be needed to keep it at bay. In the most extreme cases of gum disease, surgery may be required to maintain the structure of the mouth and jaw bone and to save the teeth.

Other Bleeding Gum Treatment Options

If you find out that your bleeding gums are not caused by the beginning of gum disease, less extreme treatment options will be recommended.

If your dentist determines that your bleeding gums are the result of improper oral hygiene practices, he or she will recommend changes to your dental hygiene routine. These recommendations may include:

Using a soft toothbrush. Hard (or stiff) bristled toothbrushes can scratch, damage and weaken both your gums and the enamel of your teeth. This can make your gums and teeth more vulnerable to gum disease and cavities. A soft-bristled brush won't irritate, scratch or injure your gums in a way that causes them to bleed.

Practice proper brushing techniques. Brush too hard, using the wrong brushing pattern or not brushing your teeth and gums long enough can cause your gums to get injured, irritated and weak to the point where they bleed. The proper teeth brushing technique recommended by dentists include using gentle, circular motions over your teeth and gums for two minutes twice a day.

Implement daily flossing. Many patients shy away from flossing for fear of causing their gums to bleed. If you practice daily flossing, your gums will eventually strengthen to the point where they will stop bleeding. Bleeding gums when you first begin flossing is normal as it is a result of weak gums, which if not addressed and strengthened, can lead to gum disease. It is recommended you floss at least once a day.

Choose a quality mouth rinse. If your mouthwash contains alcohol, throw it out. Alcohol dries out the mouth which accelerates the development of plaque that causes gum disease. An alcohol-free mouthwash won't dry out your mouth and will destroy gum disease and cavity cause bacteria and plaque.

Avoid tobacco products and a poor diet. The harsh chemicals in tobacco products can irritate gums, causing them to weaken and bleed. Tobacco also discolors teeth. A diet heavy on sugars and simple carbohydrates increases the growth and formation of plaque which accelerates the progress of gum disease and bleeding gums. Constant snacking throughout the day is also not recommended because it leads to the accumulation of plaque build-up on the gums and teeth.

Have an aligned bite. If your bite isn't properly aligned or you have crowded or missing teeth, there is a greater chance for plaque to build-up between teeth and on the gums, which can cause them to bleed. Habits such as teeth grinding or jaw clenching can put additional force on the teeth and gums, wearing them down to make them more vulnerable to decay and disease. Regular visits to your dentist are recommended if you have braces or dentures, or have TMJ. He or she can properly adjust your apparatus to ensure a proper, straight bite.

Bleeding gums are not anything to ignore. The cause of your bleeding gums can be a symptom of gum disease which can lead to additional, severe oral health issues.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Anna_Bird/2355855

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Wednesday, July 4, 2018

Happy 4th of July!


“One flag, one land, one heart, one hand, one nation evermore!” 
-Oliver Wendell Holmes

Sunday, July 1, 2018

Ready, Set, Rec! JULY


In this episode of Ready, Set, Rec! Recreation Manager Reggie Hubbard shares with us the many fun events and activities taking place in July with the City of Vacaville Recreation Department!

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Why Teeth Sensitivity and Toothaches Should Be Treated ASAP


Grimacing after each sip of hot coffee in the morning or taking painkillers every few hours to ease the throbbing pain of a toothache is not normal. It is an indication that something is wrong.

If you have tooth sensitivity or a toothache, you're probably miserable. You may think that if you continue taking Tylenol and using an ice pack, the pain will eventually go away. After all, that usually works for other body pains.

Maybe you decide to live with the pain because you're afraid of what the dentist will find. You've heard that tooth sensitivity and toothaches are symptoms of deep tooth decay and that likely treatment will range from crowns to a root canal. You don't want the hassle of undergoing a dental procedure or paying for extra dental work.

The reality is that the longer you let your tooth sensitivity and toothache to continue without getting professional treatment, the worse the pain and the damage to your tooth and gums will be.

If your tooth ache or tooth sensitivity is caused by tooth decay, it is important to have a dentist look at it sooner rather than later. The earlier the cavity is removed, the less the chance of it destroying more of the tooth and spreading to nearby teeth and gum tissue.

If left unchecked, what began as a toothache or tooth sensitivity could result in lost teeth and even possible gum and jaw issues.

Losing teeth and getting severe gum disease is nothing to take lightly. Missing teeth can cause eating and speaking difficulties as well as ruin your beautiful smile. They can even lead to the other teeth to grow in crooked which will require further dental work to correct your smile.

Severe tooth decay and gum disease can weaken a tooth's roots as well as the jaw bone that holds the teeth in place. A weakened jaw bone will less likely hold the tooth in place and it will reduce the patient's ability to have dental implants inserted to replace lost teeth.

Tooth sensitivity and toothaches indicate that somewhere the nerves in and around your teeth are exposed. This will only happen if the enamel (he tooth's hard, outside layer) has been compromised.

Tooth decay (or cavities) are almost always the culprit of weakened and destroyed tooth enamel, though in some rarer cases, a tooth's enamel is weakened because of trauma to the tooth. In the instance of tooth trauma where there is a crack on the tooth or if the tooth is broken, it is important to see the dentist immediately as it is a dental emergency.

Toothache pain and tooth sensitivity are not normal and they can greatly hinder the proper functioning of your mouth as well as lower your quality of life.

Both conditions likely indicate tooth decay or gum disease, though that isn't always the case. Regardless of the cause, it is better to have the pain and discomfort of toothaches and tooth sensitivity treated by a professional sooner rather than later as the decay and pain will only get worse.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Anna_Bird/2355855

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