Monday, January 21, 2019

Dental Health Tips for Your Baby


Tooth decay is the most common chronic disease for kids. The good news? There are steps you can take to keep your baby’s mouth healthy--even before the first tooth comes.

Friday, January 18, 2019

What Causes Bad Breath?


Stinky breath is, unfortunately, a part of life... but it doesn't have to be! Laci explores the roots of bad breath and the ways we can limit our oral stink.

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

How At-Home Oral Care and Professional, In-Office Care Help Your Oral Health


You've probably been going to the dentist as long as you can remember as a little kid. Like some patients, maybe the busyness of life or the fact that not you're an adult, you aren't forced to see the dentist.

Maybe at one point, your oral hygiene was important to you. As a kid, you did all you could to not get a cavity and get that prize reward. As you aged, however, the health of your teeth and gums has taken a back seat.

You may think that you don't need to see the dentist. After all, your mouth looks and feels great, except for the minor tooth discoloration.

Here are reasons why both at-home oral care and regular visits to the dentist office are important in maintaining great oral health:

At-Home Oral Care

Most of your oral health is your responsibility. You only go to the dentist twice a year (or more if you have a dental issue). That means all the other days, you're the only one to clean your teeth and gums and spot any irregularities.

Brushing your teeth and flossing takes only a few minutes every day. Flossing and brushing your teeth on your schedule and in the privacy of your own home can't get any easier.

Proper, at-home oral hygiene does mean more than just brushing for a couple seconds and flossing between a few teeth. You'll need to start off with a soft-bristled toothbrush that is no more than three months old and fluoride toothpaste. Brushing for two minutes, twice a day and flossing on both sides of each tooth will dramatically lower your risk of tooth decay and gum disease.

What happens when you're at work and can't brush your teeth or floss? Swishing with water, in fact drinking a lot of water is a great way to clean out your mouth after eating or drinking beverages that can stain the teeth in between brushing.

Oral health conditions such as tooth decay and gum disease happen gradually. Skipping just one day of brushing or flossing can give cavity-, gum disease-, bad breath-causing plaque a foothold. This makes at-home oral care vitally important.

If you notice something doesn't look or feel right in your mouth, you're the only one who will notice. If the condition is severe, a visit to the dentist office may be in order.

You're the only one who can care for and monitor the health of your mouth day in and day out which plays a big role in your oral health.

Regular Office Visits

Even if you already do all the above-mentioned things as part of your at-home oral hygiene routine, regular visits to the dental office are still necessary. Why?

Those dental conditions or irregularities you found that is causing severe, chronic discomfort will be best diagnosed by a trained dental professional. A dentist will also know the best course of treatment to take.

Dental offices will also have more tools and equipment than what you have at home, including specialized tartar scrapers, powerful toothbrushes, and more concentrated toothpaste. The operation of such equipment by the hygienist will also allow for a deeper and more thorough cleaning of hard-to-reach places. Dentists can also deep clean your gums using special tools and procedures and ward off possible gum disease.

Your dentist, in short, can offer the best, most effective treatment of dental issues and provide a deeper cleaning than what you can do at home.

Good at-home dental hygiene won't ensure good dental health no matter how white and healthy your teeth look. Only relying on the occasional dental office visit and the dentist recommendations also won't bring about healthy teeth and gums.

Both a solid at-home dental hygiene regimen and regular visits to the dentist office are needed to ensure the best care of your oral health.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9942472

Saturday, January 12, 2019

8 Bad Brushing Habits to Break in 2019


Keeping Your Toothbrush for Too Long
The ADA recommends changing your toothbrush every 3-4 months, so make a resolution to change your toothbrush with every season this year. Frayed and broken bristles won’t keep your teeth clean—these are signs it’s time to let go. When you’re shopping, look for one with the ADA Seal of Acceptance.

Not Brushing Long Enough
Speed demons, listen up! Your teeth should be brushed for a full two minutes, twice per day. Most of us fall short —the average time most people spend brushing is 45 seconds. If you’re racing through cleaning, try setting a timer. Or distract yourself by humming your favorite tune!

Brushing Too Hard
Be gentle with your teeth. You may think brushing harder will remove more leftover food and the bacteria that love to eat it, but a gentle brushing is all that’s needed. Too much pressure may damage your gums.

Brushing Right After Eating
If you feel the need to clean your teeth after eating or drinking, wait at least 60 minutes before brushing—especially if you have had something acidic like lemons, grapefruit or soda. Drink water or chew sugarless gum with the ADA Seal of Acceptance to help clean your mouth while you are waiting to brush.

Storing Your Brush Improperly
When you’re done brushing, keep your toothbrush upright and let it air dry in the open. Avoid keeping your toothbrush in a closed container, where germs have more opportunity to grow.

Using a Brush with Hard Bristles
Soft bristles are a safe bet. And be mindful to be gentle, especially where your gums and teeth meet, as you brush. Talk to your dentist about what kind of toothbrush is best for you.

Improper Brushing Technique
Here's one technique to try for a thorough brush: First, place your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle to the gums. Then, gently move the brush back and forth in short (tooth-wide) strokes. Next, brush the outer surfaces, the inner surfaces, and the chewing surfaces of the teeth. Finally, To clean the inside surfaces of the front teeth, tilt the brush vertically and make several up-and-down strokes.

Using a Brush That's Not the Best Fit for You
There are many toothbrushes that can leave your teeth fresh and clean, including manual and power brushes that carry the ADA Seal of Acceptance. Both get the job done. Try different types until you find one you're comfortable with. For example, a power brush can be easier to hold and does some of the work for you if you have trouble brushing. No matter which you choose to remember that it's not all about the brush—a clean mouth is really up to the brusher!

Article Source: https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/brushing-mistakes-slideshow?utm_source=mouthhealthyorg&utm_medium=mhrotator&utm_content=new-year-resolutions

Wednesday, January 9, 2019

Is Chewing Gum Better Than Flossing?


It’s long been told that chewing gum is great for your teeth, but is it? Could it be a replacement to flossing?

Sunday, January 6, 2019

Common Oral Health Issues in Older Adults


As long as many of us can remember, daily teeth brushing and flossing and visits to the dentist office every six months were a regular routine, howbeit, one we didn't particularly care for. We were told at a young age that good oral hygiene was the key in healthy teeth and gums. If proper care was done throughout our lives, we'll have more of our teeth remaining when we got older.

Yet, you likely have a grandparent or aging parents who have partial or full dentures. In fact, so many older adults have dentures that the two have subconsciously become synonymous with each other. In certain instances, poor oral hygiene is the root cause of someone losing most, if not all, of their teeth. However, this is not the case for everyone. As we age, our teeth wear out like the rest of our bodies, and are therefore more prone to disease, infections, and complications.

Many of the common oral health issues that occur as we age are exacerbated by other health issues and common medications that older adults take for those health issues. Specifically, these are the common issues of the teeth and gums that can occur:

  • Tooth loss
  • Oral cancer
  • Thrush
  • Cavities (tooth decay)
  • Gum disease
  • Infections of the mouth and sinuses
  • Inability to taste
  • Denture lesions
  • Oral candidiasis
  • Dry mouth
  • Mucosal lesions
  • Receding gums

Dry mouth can cause a variety of oral health issues, namely tooth decay, and gum disease. As we age, our saliva production gradually decreases. Saliva is the body's built-in mouth cleaner and it plays an essential role in keeping the mouth healthy, functioning properly and looking great. When not enough saliva is produced, trapped bacteria, mostly in the form of lodged food particles, have a better environment to thrive and attach onto teeth. The acid produced by this bacteria eats away at the tooth enamel, slowly penetrating deeper into the tooth. If cavities aren't treated, they can lead to tooth death and the tooth will need to be extracted. Untreated decayed teeth can also form an infection in the root of the tooth, which is in the jawbone. The infection can spread into the jawbone tissue, making the jaw weaker.

Heart medication and medication to treat blood pressure and cholesterol and depression have a known side effect of producing dry mouth.

In addition, the strength of seniors' teeth and gums are naturally weakened from many years of use, wear and tear. As we age, for instance, our enamel, the hard, outermost protective covering of the tooth gradually deteriorates, making our teeth more vulnerable to injury, decay, infections, and staining.

The lack of taste, whether it's caused by medication or other underlying health conditions such as kidney disease or chronic liver disease, can lead older adults to unintentionally harm their already compromised oral health. This might include adding excessive salt to flavor food or consuming very hot foods that burn the gums.

It is important for older adults to be vigilant about their oral health care. Regular visits to a dentist can help prevent or help the progression of oral health issues so that patients can keep more of their teeth and have strong gums.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/10002164

Thursday, January 3, 2019

Dental Issues You Shouldn't Ignore


You dislike going to the dentist and, for the most, feel that your mouth looks and feels great. You have a strong oral hygiene routine and you don't have many dental issues.

Most of your dental issues are minor and heal quickly. You don't need to see a dentist over a toothache or bad breath, you think.

Despite your dislike or fear of the dentist, here are some dental issues you shouldn't brush off and ignore:

Bad Breath

Everyone gets bad breath, but before you blame the garlic on your pizza from last night or your sloppy oral hygiene habits, you may want to reconsider. If you have chronic bad breath or worse than usual bad breath that doesn't diminish no matter what you do, a potentially serious dental condition may be to blame. Most cases of bad breath are caused by chronic halitosis, where a stubborn biofilm of bacteria hangs out in the mouth.

A more serious condition, periodontal disease, may be the source of your bad breath.

Bleeding Gums

Do your gums easily bleed, even with teeth brushing? Bleeding gums is a hallmark sign of gum disease. If treated early, before it progresses to periodontal disease, gum disease can be easily treated and reversed.

Even if you don't experience any pain or discomfort, it is highly recommended to see your dentist. Periodontal disease is not good and can result in lost teeth and weakened jawbones if not treated.

Enamel Erosion

When the enamel of your teeth gets eroded, staining isn't the only thing you need to worry about. Compromised tooth enamel also makes teeth susceptible to decay and fractures.

It's important to have decayed teeth or those with eroded enamel filled to prevent further damage to the teeth. Fillings can also help replenish the minerals lost from a weakened enamel.

Toothaches

Like tooth sensitivity, there are many causes of toothaches. Tooth pain can be a sign of eroded enamel, tooth decay, gum disease or even related to migraines and myofascial pain.

A toothache doesn't just make your life miserable, it can point to a potentially serious underlying oral or overall health condition.

Dry Mouth

If you think your dry mouth is an unpleasant, harmless condition you must bear with, think again. A dry mouth isn't just uncomfortable, but it can make your mouth vulnerable to disease, and infections.

Saliva is crucial in keeping your mouth clean. With dry mouth, saliva production is decreased, making your mouth the ideal environment for plaque, bacteria and germs to flourish.

Loose Teeth

Untreated tooth decay and gum disease can lead to loose or lost teeth. If you have a lost tooth, it may be able to be saved. If it can't the diagnosis of a dental professional can identify and treat the underlying tooth decay or gum disease to keep them from getting worse and causing additional teeth to be lost.

Loose teeth can also indicate the presence of an infection in the mouth or an autoimmune disease.

Lost Teeth

Whether you were in an accident or took a fall and knocked out a tooth, it's important to make an appointment with the dentist ASAP. Though the tooth is lost, the space in the mouth where the tooth was can be the doorway to crooked teeth, a misaligned bite and eventually the breakdown of the bones in the jaw and face.

Mouth Sores

Any kind of sore can be unpleasant. Sores in the mouth are especially a nuisance as they can be painful each time they are accidentally irritated, which, being in the mouth can be quite often. Sores in the mouth can also be symptoms of an infection or disease.

Burns, ill-fitting dentures or orthodontic wear or other health conditions such as diabetes and herpes can cause these unpleasant sores. In a few, rare cases, oral cancer is to blame. Oral cancer is easily treatable when caught early. In the later stages, however, it is difficult to treat and is often fatal.

Tooth Sensitivity

While teeth can get sensitive for a variety of reasons, some of which aren't anything to be concerned about, if the sensitivity results in chronic or severe pain or discomfort, it is a good idea to visit your dentist.

Tooth sensitivity can be the result of a fractured tooth, a loose filling or a tooth that is decayed and has a weakened enamel.

While not all dental concerns involve pain or discomfort, or are even noticeable, they no less pose a threat to your oral health. Regular visits to your dentist are important in keeping your dental health in great shape and prevent future, more serious issues from occurring.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9942448