Thursday, August 30, 2018

Why Do My Gums Bleed?


You were flossing your teeth and noticed that your gums were bleeding? Dr Katz is here to explain why gums bleed and what this can be a sign of.

Monday, August 27, 2018

How to Choose the Right Cosmetic Dental Procedure for You


Cosmetic dentistry is one of the fastest growing dental trends because more and more people are getting concerned about the physical appearance of their teeth. In fact, the majority of patients seeking cosmetic dentistry do it to improve the physical attractiveness of their teeth to gain more self-esteem and confidence.

If you've considered getting some cosmetic dental work done, you might be overwhelmed by the sheer amount of options available to you. Depending on the results you want, you may have to take some time deciding between different procedures, especially if this is your first time getting cosmetic dental work done.

Identify Your Needs First

After you've decided that you want to improve the look of your teeth, you'll need to decide exactly what that means to you. Do you want your teeth to be whiter? Maybe you want them to be straighter. You might want to finally fix that one tooth that's always looked "off." Consider what your needs are first because your cosmetic dentist will want to know what you want to achieve from the procedure.

If possible, try and find examples of what you want online. Many cosmetic dentists post before and after pictures on their websites, which you can easily find with a quick Google search. The cosmetic dentist you hire will also likely have a book of before and after pictures for you.

Get a Consultation

After you've got a good idea of the end results, set up a consultation appointment with the cosmetic dentist of your choice. These consultations are incredibly helpful as they allow you to first determine whether the dentist you chose is right for you or not. If they are, you can continue to discuss treatment plans that will work best for your situation.

If there are any facts about cosmetic dentistry you don't know, a consultation appointment is the perfect time to ask questions. In fact, most cosmetic dentists recommend you ask as many questions as you want. If you're comfortable with the procedure, their job is much easier in the long run.

Treatment and Recovery

During the initial consultation, after a specific procedure has been identified, ask about the treatment process and recovery time. Some cosmetic treatments don't require any recovery time at all, while others require several months of recovery. The amount of time you need to spend recovering may be an essential factor in your decision process.

Your dentist should explain every step of the process you choose during the consultation and subsequent appointments. This way, you know as much as you can before actually going in for the treatment itself.

Making the Decision

After attending your consultation appointment, you may want some time to go home and think about things before making your final decision. It's important you take this time to weigh all your options, if multiple are available, so you can make a decision that's best for you. If you have any additional questions during this time, don't be afraid to reach out to your cosmetic dentist.

Cosmetic dentistry can vastly improve the physical appearance of your smile, but it's also a very personal decision. Take your time making a decision. The more comfortable you feel about it, the easier the entire process will be, both for you and your dentist.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Anna_Bird/2355855

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Friday, August 24, 2018

Why Regular Dental Cleanings Are Important


Going to the dentist may seem like a chore, but it is something we should all do on a regular basis to maintain our healthy smile. Now I know what you're probably thinking--'why can't I just maintain my teeth at home, by myself?' well, you can and you should but that is in addition to going to the dentist, not an instead of scenario.

So, if we brush and floss at least twice a day, that's great, right? Yes, that is what is recommended but it is also recommended that you see your dentist for a checkup and cleaning at least once every nine months. Why? So they can continue to check for things like gingivitis, oral cancer and the like and nip problems in the bud before they become big (and painful) ones.

Say you have had a root canal on a tooth and over time that tooth has become weakened. The dentist may suggest you get a crown. If you don't do the procedure right away, the tooth may further deteriorate and you'll be left with a whole lot of pain, infection and the possibility that you could lose the tooth all together. Or, you can go for your checkups, get the necessary information, take the path your dentist recommends and suffer a little discomfort now rather than a world of hurt later on. Going to the dentist on a regular basis allows for them to monitor situations like this and guide you to the most pain-free option for fixing the problem.

Dental cleanings are also helpful in maintaining that healthy smile, making sure your teeth are all healthy and clean, your gums are healthy and your bite is great. Maintaining good oral health also leads to better overall health, so you'll want to get right on that oft forgotten appointment!

To prevent cavities, stop tooth loss, brighten that smile and freshen your breath, there is nothing like a professional cleaning. Oh, and while you're there they'll do X-rays that can show them any potential problems arising while keeping them on file to compare to subsequent films they will take on other days, keeping tabs on your teeth from the inside as it were.

So, go ahead and make that appointment. You'll be glad you did when your mouth gets a clean bill of health and you see all of your daily brushing and flossing paying off!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Amanda_J_Hales/1311545

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Tuesday, August 21, 2018

The Importance of Proper Dental Hygiene and Care


Ever since you were little, either your parents, dentist or both have told you the importance of proper dental hygiene and care. You know that brushing and flossing your teeth on a daily basis will cut down on bad breath and lower your risk of cavities and gum disease.

But what is the big deal? If you develop gum disease or tooth decay, can't the dentist easily fix it at your six month check-up and cleaning?

Tooth decay and gum disease are bad news and not things to take lightly. Yes, cavities can be treated with fillings and crowns, but these dental procedures will cost you. Crowns, especially can be expensive and require multiple trips to the dental office.

Most American adults have some form of gum disease. Fortunately, in most cases, the severity isn't that great and the disease can be stopped and reversed with professional dental procedures like deep cleaning, root planning and scaling and root canals. Sometimes improved at-home dental oral hygiene can be enough to reverse a patient's gum disease.

Like cavities, treating minor gum disease can be expensive and time-consuming with multiple appointments needed.

What happens when a patient who doesn't practice sufficient, proper at-home dental hygiene has moderate to severe tooth decay and gum disease?

First, the extent and invasiveness of the necessary dental procedures to treat them will increase which means more expenses, more time in the dentist chair and a longer recovery time. A root canal, for instance, will be more expensive, painful and take longer to recover from than a filling or deep cleaning, for example.

There is likely going to be more pain and discomfort and one's ability to chew and bite may be hindered. If you don't daily brush and floss your teeth and the plaque builds up on your teeth and along the gum line, your teeth and gums will become more sensitive and the decay weakens them. Infection-like symptoms such as pain, discomfort, swelling and bleeding are likely to occur, which can make everyday life miserable. The discomfort can be constant or it can come about with chewing or consuming hot or cold foods and beverages.

If nothing is done about the gum disease or tooth decay and infrequent, poor dental hygiene is continued, tooth loss and the breakdown of the jaw bone can occur. The loss of teeth and the disintegration of the jaw bones will make proper eating and clear speaking difficult. On top of that, one's once proud, bright, straight smile will be destroyed by embarrassing gaps.

Patients may think that a few missing teeth are no big deal, but it is missing teeth that prevent people from smiling and experiencing the positive effects of showing off their beautiful, natural smiles. People who don't smile are seen as unhappy, negative, self-conscious and anxious. Social and professional opportunities can be missed as friends and others will avoid someone who doesn't smile and bosses will more likely pass over employees who don't smile, and therefore, lack confidence, for jobs and promotions.

Missing teeth can also cause other teeth to grow crooked, which will require even more dental work to be done.

Patients who don't practice daily, proper, dental hygiene risk needing expensive, extensive dental procedures, a lower quality of life, missing teeth and compromised jaw bones.

When your dentist stresses the importance and need for proper dental hygiene, don't ignore it. You will be glad you didn't in the future.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Anna_Bird/2355855

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Saturday, August 18, 2018

Back to School Dental Health


Dr. Stephanie Kinsey, Owner of Palencia Dental is here to show us some painless dental options for kids.

Wednesday, August 15, 2018

5 Serious TMJ Disorder Symptoms You Shouldn't Ignore



Temporomandibular joint and muscle disorder (TMJD) is one of the prevalent chronic pain conditions among youngsters & is mostly ignored. According to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, prevalence rate is between 5% and 12% and over 10 million Americans are affected by this.
The Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the skull. When injured, there is a chronic pain and dysfunction in the jaw joint and muscles that control movements in the area. As per the research it is caused by the combination of factors like- grinding, clenching, chewing, arthritis, stress, movement of ball and socket etc.
Here are some serious symptoms one should look out for:
1. Limited Ability to Open the Mouth Wide
This might not seem a big issue until you reflexively yawn and the jaw locks painfully. This condition indicates that disc movement between the ball and socket in the joint has moved which is extremely uncomfortable especially for youngsters who are used-to of chewing. In such case, your dentist needs to be alerted immediately to avoid more damages.
2. Excruciating Pain and Tenderness in the Lower Face
This extends to the shoulders, jaw area, and the neck, especially when you chew. When you try to open your mouth wide, you will also feel a sudden spasm of sharpness that will affect your eating habits with time. Again, this symptom needs to be checked at a dentist's facility.
3. Swelling on Your Face
Dentists first examine your teeth to ascertain if there is any gum problem and if they don't find any, they will start doing a detailed diagnosis. It is important to go for early treatment & avoid further damages. This also improves your dental health.
4. Ear Pain
The proximity of the affected area to the ear inevitably leads to ear discomfort. This is a highly ignored symptom as most of the people argue that it is temporary. If it recurs, then it's important to get checkup done for this condition as you might also experience popping sounds in the ear.
5. Tired Feeling on the Face
This is also a highly ignored danger sign for this dental condition. Most people assume that it is a result of a hard day at work, but if you don't get a checkup on or before the time, it can exacerbate to something more uncomfortable.
For early diagnosis and treatment, make sure to visit your dentist regularly. Not only does it improve your oral health, but also alleviates worse damage to the entire dental outlook and you will not feel discomfort while eating, which will improve your life greatly.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9406994

Sunday, August 12, 2018

ADA Science Inside: How Tooth Whitening Works



Over time, teeth can go from white to not-so-bright for a number of reasons. Find out what foods can stain your teeth, and learn why your teeth darken with age. Then, watch as Dr. Jane Gillette from the American Dental Association explains how bleaching ingredients brighten your smile and walks through the whitening treatments you can try at home or have done in your dentist’s office.

Thursday, August 9, 2018

Fear of the Dentist? 3 Tips to Help Ease Dental Anxiety


A recent study showed that 6 in 10 Americans are too scared to go to the dentist. Why so scared of someone who is helping our health? We're brushing up on dental anxieties on the Breakdown.

Monday, August 6, 2018

The Causes of Common Dental Issues


As long as you can remember, you've heard the words "cavities" and "gum disease" many times. Chances are you've had at least one cavity and one bout of gingivitis (low-level gum disease) so far in your life time. These tend to be the most common dental issues patients are familiar with. As there is a lot that goes on in the mouth as well as a wide range of foods and drinks that enter it throughout the day, many other dental issues can also occur. Some of these you may or may not have experienced:

  • Tooth Sensitivity
  • Chronic Bad Breath
  • Chronic Dry Mouth
  • Canker Sores
  • Tooth and Jaw Pain
Causes of Dental Issues

There are multiple causes of the aforementioned common dental issues. Many causes are things a patient can do something about. Below are the common dental health issue causes:

Poor dental health and hygiene. Poor dental health as the result of improper or sub-par at-home oral hygiene is the most common cause for the majority of common dental issues. The lack of flossing and inconsistency of teeth brushing can leave decaying food particles in the mouth which cause tooth decay and gum disease which can then lead to additional oral health problems such as bad breath, lost teeth and weakened jaw bones.

Trauma. Trauma to the teeth or gums as a result of an injury can damage and weaken protective tissue that can make one's mouth more susceptible to tooth decay, broken or chipped teeth, jaw injury and lost teeth. Most common accidents to the mouth involve the breaking, cracking, chipping or losing of teeth. Should any of these happen, patients are to go to the nearest dentist or ER room ASAP as prompt treatment is needed to save the teeth.

Underlying overall health conditions. Autoimmune diseases such as HIV and health conditions such as diabetes can put one at an increased risk of dental health issues by making one's teeth and gums more vulnerable to infection and disease. These aforementioned conditions also lower the mouth's ability to fight off disease and infection.

Underlying oral conditions. Tooth sensitivity, bleeding gums, bad breath and canker sores can all be the results of tooth decay, gum disease or another oral infection. A sore jaw, dry mouth and chronic bad breath can be the result of TMJ, bruxism (unconscious teeth grinding and jaw clenching) or another dysfunction in the functioning of the mouth.

There are many different causes to common dental issues. Some of the causes can be more easily reduced or dealt with by the oral hygiene habits of the patient. Others are more outside of the patient's control and will require the help of a trained dental professional.

Regular, routine dental checkups and cleanings at the dental office play an important part in the prevention, diagnosis and prompt treatment of common oral health conditions. Whether or not you feel any discomfort or notice anything abnormal in your mouth, it is highly recommended that one schedules an appointment with their dentist every six months for a routine teeth cleaning and oral exam.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Anna_Bird/2355855

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Friday, August 3, 2018

ADA Science Inside: What’s In My Toothpaste?



From whitening to desensitizing, there are many different toothpastes for many different uses. Do you know what’s in your toothpaste of choice, and why? Dr. Jane Gillette from the American Dental Association breaks down the most important ingredients and explains how they help keep your teeth and gums healthy.