Sunday, February 17, 2019

How Cosmetic Dentistry Can Improve Your Life


Is your smile the way you want it to be or are there significant flaws that keep you from showing it off to the world?

Most people can identify at least one characteristic of their smile that falls short and where improvements can be made.

While restorative dentistry can get your teeth and gums into tip-top great health and proper function, cosmetic dentistry can make them look their best.

Cosmetic dentistry can achieve the following smile enhancements:

  • Whiten teeth
  • Reduce or eliminate tooth discoloration and staining
  • Repair small chips and fractures on teeth
  • Reverse tooth wear by improving the support and structure of teeth
  • Correct misshapen teeth
  • Reduce or fill in spacing or gaps between teeth
  • Lengthen teeth
  • Correct the symmetry of one's smile Strengthen and reduce the pain of sensitive teeth

Some patients may be hesitant at the idea of undergoing cosmetic dental procedures, seeing them as unnecessary. For others, it might be the cost. Is cosmetic dental work worth the price?

Cosmetic dentistry often gets put into a box that encompasses such procedures as teeth whitening and veneers. However, cosmetic dentistry is much more than that. Dental implants, for instance, is a cosmetic dental procedure.

Cosmetic dentistry has come a long way and can now not only make teeth look great, but can also refine the tooth's functioning.

Regardless of your concerns and views of cosmetic dentistry, many patients have had their lives changed as a result of a cosmetic dental procedure.

Here are ways cosmetic dentistry can change your life:

Improve your self-image and self-confidence. Cosmetic dentistry can whiten, reshape and smooth teeth, giving you a flawless look that you'll not be ashamed to show the world.

People who feel good about how they look are happier and smile more often. In addition, those who smile are seen as more welcoming and confident.

Smiling and showing off your pearly whites is also a great way to make a positive first impression.

Always look good and turn heads. Some patients opt to undergo cosmetic dental procedures because of an upcoming event such as a wedding, high school reunion or job interview. A white, straight, symmetrical smile will help you get the attention and praise from others. However, with the lower costs of cosmetic dentistry and the ease and quickness of many of the procedures, patients don't need a special occasion to give their smiles a needed facelift. Looking good every day can be just as powerful.

Improve your oral health. After your smile makeover is complete, you'll want it to last as long as possible. To retain the new bright, straight smile, good dental hygiene, and lifestyle and dietary changes are required.

A lack of proper oral hygiene will make the pearly white fade as well as the lifestyle choice of smoking. Certain foods and drinks such as coffee, tea soda, citrus, candy, and bread can sabotage your new, perfect smile.

Live with reduced pain. Crooked, misshapen and misaligned teeth can cause potentially severe pain in your jaw, neck, face, and head. Veneers and dental implants can help lengthen and reshape teeth as well as fill in gaps between teeth. Properly aligned, proportional and straight teeth can reduce or eliminate pain, which can improve your quality of life.

You can live a longer, happier life. Want to learn another benefit of smiling? A longer, happier life. A confident, pain-free smile can add years to your life. Smiling reduces stress which has a negative effect on the body. Besides reducing stress, smiling also boosts the immune system.

Teeth whitening, implants, veneers, and other cosmetic dentistry procedures can bring about significant, positive changes to your life. Cosmetic dentistry can beautify your smile by whitening, lengthening, and reshaping teeth as well as fill in embarrassing gaps. Besides making your smile look the best it can be, cosmetic dentistry can make your life happier and longer by improving the health of your mouth and reducing pain and discomfort.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Anna_Bird/2355855

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9926833

Thursday, February 14, 2019

How Should I Clean and Store My Toothbrush?



Your toothbrush helps keep your mouth clean, so it’s only natural to want to keep it pristine. Find out the right way to clean and store your toothbrush in this “Ask an ADA Dentist” video question.

Monday, February 11, 2019

The Smooch: Cavity Protection


Taking care of your teeth and gums makes you less likely to develop cavities and lose teeth. Don’t wait for a toothache to happen before you visit the dentist.

Friday, February 8, 2019

What Are Dental Sealants and Why Should My Child Get Them?


You may have taken your young child to the dentist office where the dentist suggests your son or daughter get sealants. Sealants are great ways to protect your child's teeth, in addition to daily, proper oral hygiene.

Dental sealants are usually recommended for young children who are in the early stages of learning to properly brush their teeth. They can, however, be placed on an adult's teeth. Seniors who have arthritis and other issues that keep them from properly brushing and flossing their teeth can also benefit from sealants.

Brushing their teeth can be challenging for small children. Comfortably gripping the toothbrush, learning the right toothbrush motions and resisting the urge to swallow the toothpaste can make teeth brushing very difficult. As a result, children can get frustrated and not brush as well as they should.

Sealants won't make teeth brushing fun, though it is important for your child to enjoy brushing his or her teeth, they can provide a safety buffer to make up for their inadequate, less-than-ideal teeth cleaning.

When children are first learning to brush their teeth, there are many areas where they may miss, such as brushing the back molars or the backside of their front teeth. When those hard to reach places aren't cleaned, the trapped food particles can breakdown and form cavity-causing plaque.

Sealants help protect a child's teeth by covering the teeth with a thin, plastic covering. Sealants can't be felt and their transparent nature makes them unnoticeable. Usually, sealants are placed over the molars as those teeth get a lot of chewing action and they are hard to reach when brushing and flossing.

Sealants are most effective when they are placed over the molars shortly after they erupt, or come up from the gum line, which is typically at ages 6 and 12. The process of placing sealants is quick, easy and pain-free.

Sealants are often made from clear plastic that fits snuggly around individual teeth, making them virtually unnoticeable to the child and others.

Why Sealants?

As mentioned previously, dental sealants block out cavity-causing debris, germs, and bacteria. While your child should learn daily, proper oral hygiene, sealants help protect their teeth from decay by complimenting their established teeth cleaning routine.

Cavities are one of the most widespread and preventable childhood diseases. The over-indulgence of unhealthy, sugary snacks, as well as inadequate oral hygiene, are the two major causes.

Sealants prevent food particles, especially sugar, from getting embedded onto the surface and crevices of teeth. With the teeth (mainly molars) being protected from cavity-causing plaque and food debris build-up, your child will have a significantly lower chance of tooth decay.

Tooth decay in children is often overlooked. It isn't uncommon for the health of a child's primary (or baby) teeth to be neglected. Many parents think those baby teeth are unimportant because they will all eventually fall out. However, cavities in the baby teeth can filter down into the up-and-coming permanent adult teeth. Children who start off with cavities risk other oral health issues such as crooked or misshapen teeth and misaligned bites. The psychological block a child may develop from early cavities may make him or her apathetic towards proper, daily oral hygiene and he or she may even dislike and resist properly caring for their teeth and gums later in life.

Sealants not only help protect children teeth from cavities, but it also gives them added self-confidence and have a greater joy of properly caring for their oral health.

If your child may need sealants, schedule an appointment with your child's pediatric dentist.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9965171

Tuesday, February 5, 2019

The Couch Orthodontia


Taking care of your teeth and gums makes you less likely to develop cavities and lose teeth. Don’t wait for a toothache to happen before you visit the dentist.

Saturday, February 2, 2019

Why Should a Toothache Be Taken Seriously?


Chances are you've experienced a toothache. These dental conditions are common and have a variety of causes. Sometimes they are no more than tooth sensitivity. Other times they may cause debilitating pain.

If you have an aching tooth, you can either shake it off as tooth sensitivity if it isn't too severe or you think something is terribly wrong when the pain is excruciating. Sometimes you may be tempted to stick it out as long as you can, bearing with the pain and thinking it will go away on its own. However, this isn't always the case.

Sometimes toothaches may be the result of a chronic condition that hasn't been properly dealt with. Instead of clearing up on its own, it spreads, causing further damage to your teeth and gums.

As much as you may dislike the dentist, there are some circumstances whereby immediate attention from a dental professional is important. If your tooth, for instance, is causing constant, unbearable pain, will likely cause you to break down and seek immediate professional dental care.

A broken, cracked or chipped tooth can create a toothache that suddenly starts. When a tooth experiences trauma, such as being broken or chipped, the enamel of the tooth becomes weakened and compromised. The tooth enamel is the hard, translucent outer layer. It protects the inside of the tooth from infection and decay and it gives the tooth the stability and hardness to function properly. When the tooth enamel becomes compromised, the nerves inside the tooth and the roots of the tooth become exposed, leading to pain and sensitivity. In many cases, a broken, cracked or chipped tooth can be repaired.

Another source of toothache pain can come from a tooth that is abscessed. Tooth abscesses are the result of an untreated oral health condition that creates an infection. A tooth abscess is usually the result of an untreated cavity whereby the germs and bacteria from the tooth decay spread down (or up) into the root of the tooth. Abscessed teeth can be saved with a root canal. In instances where the tooth abscess is too great, the tooth will need to be extracted. You'll know whether you have an abscessed tooth or not. These often cause excruciating pain and can be accompanied by a host of other unpleasant symptoms including: fever, swollen, red gums, sore, swollen glands in the neck, unusual tastes in the mouth, bad breath, a stiff and swollen jaw and open sores on the gums that may drain. Abscessed teeth can lead to lost teeth and destruction of the gum tissue and jaw bone. The germs and bacteria that is in the pus that is excreted from the open sores of the gum can get into the bloodstream causing life-threatening health conditions such as a blood infection.

One's tooth sensitivity is often the result of an underlying oral health issue. It may stay at a temporary tooth sensitivity such as when a tooth is broken or chipped. In other instances, the pain can become worse, to the point where the pain is nearly unbearable. Regardless of how severe or not your tooth sensitivity is, it is worth it to have it looked at a dental professional. Your dentist will be able to diagnose the cause of your tooth sensitivity and apply the appropriate treatment.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9965144

Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Top Ways Dentists Can Help You Get a Better Smile


We all know that dentists can help us get a healthier, stronger smile by providing regular teeth cleanings and diagnosing and treating problems early, such as by filling cavities. However, the right dental professional can also help you get the smile you've always dreamed of by offering cosmetic dental procedures that can transform your whole mouth.

Here are a few of the top ways that the right dentist can help you get healthier teeth and a more beautiful smile:

Implants

You may not think that you have any reason to worry about missing a tooth if you are young and healthy. However, accidents can happen at any time, knocking out one or more of your teeth. You could also crack a tooth, requiring it to be pulled. Decay or gum disease can also cause you to lose a tooth, leaving an unsightly hole. A gap is a huge distraction from an otherwise beautiful smile.

A cosmetic dentist can help you fill the gap without having to pull other teeth by installing a dental implant. This tooth is designed to look like all your others, including matching the shade, and it is inserted directly into your jawbone. It will look like a natural part of your teeth.

Veneers

Veneers can fix all kinds of dental problems. Say you have crooked teeth, but you never got braces as a child and now you're too self-conscious to get them as an adult, or you just don't want to wear them for the years required to get results. Instead, you can get veneers. Say you have misshapen or discolored teeth and you want a fast solution. You can get veneers.

Veneers fit over your natural teeth, and they can make your smile straighter, whiter and more uniform. Many cosmetic dentists offer the procedure, and it produces fast results.

Teeth Whitening

Perhaps one of the most common complaints that people have about their teeth is that they aren't white enough. They may try whitening toothpaste or gels at home but become frustrated by the lack of results. If you are experiencing the same situation, you can see a dentist and get professional teeth whitening.

Several options are available for whitening, including light treatment or high-strength professional gels in custom trays. Results vary, but you can lighten your teeth as much as seven shades with professional teeth whitening. Of course, you'll have to continue to take great care of your teeth or else they will become stained again soon after whitening.

Dentists can provide you with much more than a routine cleaning. If you visit the right cosmetic dentist, you can gain access to a wide range of dental services that will help you transform your smile and feel more confident every time you step outside your door. These are just a few of the top dental procedures that you might consider for improving your smile. Many more options are available based on your needs.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Andrew_Stratton/83489

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9053152

Sunday, January 27, 2019

How to Choose the Right Cosmetic Dental Procedure for You


Cosmetic dentistry is one of the fastest growing dental trends because more and more people are getting concerned about the physical appearance of their teeth. In fact, the majority of patients seeking cosmetic dentistry do it to improve the physical attractiveness of their teeth to gain more self-esteem and confidence.

If you've considered getting some cosmetic dental work done, you might be overwhelmed by the sheer amount of options available to you. Depending on the results you want, you may have to take some time deciding between different procedures, especially if this is your first time getting cosmetic dental work done.

Identify Your Needs First

After you've decided that you want to improve the look of your teeth, you'll need to decide exactly what that means to you. Do you want your teeth to be whiter? Maybe you want them to be straighter. You might want to finally fix that one tooth that's always looked "off." Consider what your needs are first because your cosmetic dentist will want to know what you want to achieve from the procedure.

If possible, try and find examples of what you want online. Many cosmetic dentists post before and after pictures on their websites, which you can easily find with a quick Google search. The cosmetic dentist you hire will also likely have a book of before and after pictures for you.

Get a Consultation

After you've got a good idea of the end results, set up a consultation appointment with the cosmetic dentist of your choice. These consultations are incredibly helpful as they allow you to first determine whether the dentist you chose is right for you or not. If they are, you can continue to discuss treatment plans that will work best for your situation.

If there are any facts about cosmetic dentistry you don't know, a consultation appointment is a perfect time to ask questions. In fact, most cosmetic dentists recommend you ask as many questions as you want. If you're comfortable with the procedure, their job is much easier in the long run.

Treatment and Recovery

During the initial consultation, after a specific procedure has been identified, ask about the treatment process and recovery time. Some cosmetic treatments don't require any recovery time at all, while others require several months of recovery. The amount of time you need to spend recovering may be an essential factor in your decision process.

Your dentist should explain every step of the process you choose during the consultation and subsequent appointments. This way, you know as much as you can before actually going in for the treatment itself.

Making the Decision

After attending your consultation appointment, you may want some time to go home and think about things before making your final decision. It's important you take this time to weigh all your options, if multiple are available, so you can make a decision that's best for you. If you have any additional questions during this time, don't be afraid to reach out to your cosmetic dentist.

Cosmetic dentistry can vastly improve the physical appearance of your smile, but it's also a very personal decision. Take your time making a decision. The more comfortable you feel about it, the easier the entire process will be, both for you and your dentist.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Anna_Bird/2355855

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9850993

Thursday, January 24, 2019

Do I Need a Crown?


A lot of people, especially patients of mine, ask about crowns and whether it's worth it. A crown is like a safety helmet. It protects the tooth for further damage.

Monday, January 21, 2019

Dental Health Tips for Your Baby


Tooth decay is the most common chronic disease for kids. The good news? There are steps you can take to keep your baby’s mouth healthy--even before the first tooth comes.

Friday, January 18, 2019

What Causes Bad Breath?


Stinky breath is, unfortunately, a part of life... but it doesn't have to be! Laci explores the roots of bad breath and the ways we can limit our oral stink.

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

How At-Home Oral Care and Professional, In-Office Care Help Your Oral Health


You've probably been going to the dentist as long as you can remember as a little kid. Like some patients, maybe the busyness of life or the fact that not you're an adult, you aren't forced to see the dentist.

Maybe at one point, your oral hygiene was important to you. As a kid, you did all you could to not get a cavity and get that prize reward. As you aged, however, the health of your teeth and gums has taken a back seat.

You may think that you don't need to see the dentist. After all, your mouth looks and feels great, except for the minor tooth discoloration.

Here are reasons why both at-home oral care and regular visits to the dentist office are important in maintaining great oral health:

At-Home Oral Care

Most of your oral health is your responsibility. You only go to the dentist twice a year (or more if you have a dental issue). That means all the other days, you're the only one to clean your teeth and gums and spot any irregularities.

Brushing your teeth and flossing takes only a few minutes every day. Flossing and brushing your teeth on your schedule and in the privacy of your own home can't get any easier.

Proper, at-home oral hygiene does mean more than just brushing for a couple seconds and flossing between a few teeth. You'll need to start off with a soft-bristled toothbrush that is no more than three months old and fluoride toothpaste. Brushing for two minutes, twice a day and flossing on both sides of each tooth will dramatically lower your risk of tooth decay and gum disease.

What happens when you're at work and can't brush your teeth or floss? Swishing with water, in fact drinking a lot of water is a great way to clean out your mouth after eating or drinking beverages that can stain the teeth in between brushing.

Oral health conditions such as tooth decay and gum disease happen gradually. Skipping just one day of brushing or flossing can give cavity-, gum disease-, bad breath-causing plaque a foothold. This makes at-home oral care vitally important.

If you notice something doesn't look or feel right in your mouth, you're the only one who will notice. If the condition is severe, a visit to the dentist office may be in order.

You're the only one who can care for and monitor the health of your mouth day in and day out which plays a big role in your oral health.

Regular Office Visits

Even if you already do all the above-mentioned things as part of your at-home oral hygiene routine, regular visits to the dental office are still necessary. Why?

Those dental conditions or irregularities you found that is causing severe, chronic discomfort will be best diagnosed by a trained dental professional. A dentist will also know the best course of treatment to take.

Dental offices will also have more tools and equipment than what you have at home, including specialized tartar scrapers, powerful toothbrushes, and more concentrated toothpaste. The operation of such equipment by the hygienist will also allow for a deeper and more thorough cleaning of hard-to-reach places. Dentists can also deep clean your gums using special tools and procedures and ward off possible gum disease.

Your dentist, in short, can offer the best, most effective treatment of dental issues and provide a deeper cleaning than what you can do at home.

Good at-home dental hygiene won't ensure good dental health no matter how white and healthy your teeth look. Only relying on the occasional dental office visit and the dentist recommendations also won't bring about healthy teeth and gums.

Both a solid at-home dental hygiene regimen and regular visits to the dentist office are needed to ensure the best care of your oral health.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9942472

Saturday, January 12, 2019

8 Bad Brushing Habits to Break in 2019


Keeping Your Toothbrush for Too Long
The ADA recommends changing your toothbrush every 3-4 months, so make a resolution to change your toothbrush with every season this year. Frayed and broken bristles won’t keep your teeth clean—these are signs it’s time to let go. When you’re shopping, look for one with the ADA Seal of Acceptance.

Not Brushing Long Enough
Speed demons, listen up! Your teeth should be brushed for a full two minutes, twice per day. Most of us fall short —the average time most people spend brushing is 45 seconds. If you’re racing through cleaning, try setting a timer. Or distract yourself by humming your favorite tune!

Brushing Too Hard
Be gentle with your teeth. You may think brushing harder will remove more leftover food and the bacteria that love to eat it, but a gentle brushing is all that’s needed. Too much pressure may damage your gums.

Brushing Right After Eating
If you feel the need to clean your teeth after eating or drinking, wait at least 60 minutes before brushing—especially if you have had something acidic like lemons, grapefruit or soda. Drink water or chew sugarless gum with the ADA Seal of Acceptance to help clean your mouth while you are waiting to brush.

Storing Your Brush Improperly
When you’re done brushing, keep your toothbrush upright and let it air dry in the open. Avoid keeping your toothbrush in a closed container, where germs have more opportunity to grow.

Using a Brush with Hard Bristles
Soft bristles are a safe bet. And be mindful to be gentle, especially where your gums and teeth meet, as you brush. Talk to your dentist about what kind of toothbrush is best for you.

Improper Brushing Technique
Here's one technique to try for a thorough brush: First, place your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle to the gums. Then, gently move the brush back and forth in short (tooth-wide) strokes. Next, brush the outer surfaces, the inner surfaces, and the chewing surfaces of the teeth. Finally, To clean the inside surfaces of the front teeth, tilt the brush vertically and make several up-and-down strokes.

Using a Brush That's Not the Best Fit for You
There are many toothbrushes that can leave your teeth fresh and clean, including manual and power brushes that carry the ADA Seal of Acceptance. Both get the job done. Try different types until you find one you're comfortable with. For example, a power brush can be easier to hold and does some of the work for you if you have trouble brushing. No matter which you choose to remember that it's not all about the brush—a clean mouth is really up to the brusher!

Article Source: https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/brushing-mistakes-slideshow?utm_source=mouthhealthyorg&utm_medium=mhrotator&utm_content=new-year-resolutions

Wednesday, January 9, 2019

Is Chewing Gum Better Than Flossing?


It’s long been told that chewing gum is great for your teeth, but is it? Could it be a replacement to flossing?

Sunday, January 6, 2019

Common Oral Health Issues in Older Adults


As long as many of us can remember, daily teeth brushing and flossing and visits to the dentist office every six months were a regular routine, howbeit, one we didn't particularly care for. We were told at a young age that good oral hygiene was the key in healthy teeth and gums. If proper care was done throughout our lives, we'll have more of our teeth remaining when we got older.

Yet, you likely have a grandparent or aging parents who have partial or full dentures. In fact, so many older adults have dentures that the two have subconsciously become synonymous with each other. In certain instances, poor oral hygiene is the root cause of someone losing most, if not all, of their teeth. However, this is not the case for everyone. As we age, our teeth wear out like the rest of our bodies, and are therefore more prone to disease, infections, and complications.

Many of the common oral health issues that occur as we age are exacerbated by other health issues and common medications that older adults take for those health issues. Specifically, these are the common issues of the teeth and gums that can occur:

  • Tooth loss
  • Oral cancer
  • Thrush
  • Cavities (tooth decay)
  • Gum disease
  • Infections of the mouth and sinuses
  • Inability to taste
  • Denture lesions
  • Oral candidiasis
  • Dry mouth
  • Mucosal lesions
  • Receding gums

Dry mouth can cause a variety of oral health issues, namely tooth decay, and gum disease. As we age, our saliva production gradually decreases. Saliva is the body's built-in mouth cleaner and it plays an essential role in keeping the mouth healthy, functioning properly and looking great. When not enough saliva is produced, trapped bacteria, mostly in the form of lodged food particles, have a better environment to thrive and attach onto teeth. The acid produced by this bacteria eats away at the tooth enamel, slowly penetrating deeper into the tooth. If cavities aren't treated, they can lead to tooth death and the tooth will need to be extracted. Untreated decayed teeth can also form an infection in the root of the tooth, which is in the jawbone. The infection can spread into the jawbone tissue, making the jaw weaker.

Heart medication and medication to treat blood pressure and cholesterol and depression have a known side effect of producing dry mouth.

In addition, the strength of seniors' teeth and gums are naturally weakened from many years of use, wear and tear. As we age, for instance, our enamel, the hard, outermost protective covering of the tooth gradually deteriorates, making our teeth more vulnerable to injury, decay, infections, and staining.

The lack of taste, whether it's caused by medication or other underlying health conditions such as kidney disease or chronic liver disease, can lead older adults to unintentionally harm their already compromised oral health. This might include adding excessive salt to flavor food or consuming very hot foods that burn the gums.

It is important for older adults to be vigilant about their oral health care. Regular visits to a dentist can help prevent or help the progression of oral health issues so that patients can keep more of their teeth and have strong gums.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/10002164

Thursday, January 3, 2019

Dental Issues You Shouldn't Ignore


You dislike going to the dentist and, for the most, feel that your mouth looks and feels great. You have a strong oral hygiene routine and you don't have many dental issues.

Most of your dental issues are minor and heal quickly. You don't need to see a dentist over a toothache or bad breath, you think.

Despite your dislike or fear of the dentist, here are some dental issues you shouldn't brush off and ignore:

Bad Breath

Everyone gets bad breath, but before you blame the garlic on your pizza from last night or your sloppy oral hygiene habits, you may want to reconsider. If you have chronic bad breath or worse than usual bad breath that doesn't diminish no matter what you do, a potentially serious dental condition may be to blame. Most cases of bad breath are caused by chronic halitosis, where a stubborn biofilm of bacteria hangs out in the mouth.

A more serious condition, periodontal disease, may be the source of your bad breath.

Bleeding Gums

Do your gums easily bleed, even with teeth brushing? Bleeding gums is a hallmark sign of gum disease. If treated early, before it progresses to periodontal disease, gum disease can be easily treated and reversed.

Even if you don't experience any pain or discomfort, it is highly recommended to see your dentist. Periodontal disease is not good and can result in lost teeth and weakened jawbones if not treated.

Enamel Erosion

When the enamel of your teeth gets eroded, staining isn't the only thing you need to worry about. Compromised tooth enamel also makes teeth susceptible to decay and fractures.

It's important to have decayed teeth or those with eroded enamel filled to prevent further damage to the teeth. Fillings can also help replenish the minerals lost from a weakened enamel.

Toothaches

Like tooth sensitivity, there are many causes of toothaches. Tooth pain can be a sign of eroded enamel, tooth decay, gum disease or even related to migraines and myofascial pain.

A toothache doesn't just make your life miserable, it can point to a potentially serious underlying oral or overall health condition.

Dry Mouth

If you think your dry mouth is an unpleasant, harmless condition you must bear with, think again. A dry mouth isn't just uncomfortable, but it can make your mouth vulnerable to disease, and infections.

Saliva is crucial in keeping your mouth clean. With dry mouth, saliva production is decreased, making your mouth the ideal environment for plaque, bacteria and germs to flourish.

Loose Teeth

Untreated tooth decay and gum disease can lead to loose or lost teeth. If you have a lost tooth, it may be able to be saved. If it can't the diagnosis of a dental professional can identify and treat the underlying tooth decay or gum disease to keep them from getting worse and causing additional teeth to be lost.

Loose teeth can also indicate the presence of an infection in the mouth or an autoimmune disease.

Lost Teeth

Whether you were in an accident or took a fall and knocked out a tooth, it's important to make an appointment with the dentist ASAP. Though the tooth is lost, the space in the mouth where the tooth was can be the doorway to crooked teeth, a misaligned bite and eventually the breakdown of the bones in the jaw and face.

Mouth Sores

Any kind of sore can be unpleasant. Sores in the mouth are especially a nuisance as they can be painful each time they are accidentally irritated, which, being in the mouth can be quite often. Sores in the mouth can also be symptoms of an infection or disease.

Burns, ill-fitting dentures or orthodontic wear or other health conditions such as diabetes and herpes can cause these unpleasant sores. In a few, rare cases, oral cancer is to blame. Oral cancer is easily treatable when caught early. In the later stages, however, it is difficult to treat and is often fatal.

Tooth Sensitivity

While teeth can get sensitive for a variety of reasons, some of which aren't anything to be concerned about, if the sensitivity results in chronic or severe pain or discomfort, it is a good idea to visit your dentist.

Tooth sensitivity can be the result of a fractured tooth, a loose filling or a tooth that is decayed and has a weakened enamel.

While not all dental concerns involve pain or discomfort, or are even noticeable, they no less pose a threat to your oral health. Regular visits to your dentist are important in keeping your dental health in great shape and prevent future, more serious issues from occurring.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9942448